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    Publicado el 2.6.2016 por Equipo GNOSS

    ¿Qué pasó con la Web Semántica? - What happened to the Semantic Web? - Kingsley Idehen

    Kingsley Idehen, CEO de Openlink Software, creadores de Virtuoso, expone en este post su visión sobre el estado actual de la Web Semántica.

    El provocador título del post es el punto de partida para rebatir la idea de que la web semántica sea una promesa tecnológica incumplida, sino que, más bien, lo que ha sucedido es que su llegada no ha tenido la espectacularidad que algunos esperaban. En palabras de Kingsley Idehen: "In this post, I will demonstrate that as expected [1][2], its arrival was without fanfare, but we are inarguably there."

    El autor proporciona dos ejemplos, relacionados con la experiencia de búsqueda, particularmente en Google.

    En primer lugar, la creación del vocabulario compartido Schema.org, por parte de Google, Microsoft, Yahoo!, Yandex, y otros.

    En segundo, la creación del Knowledge Graph de Google, y su aplicación indirecta en las búsquedas normales, y directa en búsquedas especiales (Custom Search Engine).

    Estos ejemplos demuestran que los objetivos básicos de la Web Semántica ya se han alcanzado:

    • La web está llena de documentos HTML que incluyen datos semánticamente enriquecidos.
    • Estos documentos crean una nueva dimensión Web en la que los enlaces ya no son sólo entre documentos, sino que funcionan como nombres desambiguados para cualquier entidad, permitiendo la construcción de sentencias en lenguaje natural para codificar y decodificar información (datos contextualizados), comprensibles por usuarios y máquinas (bots).

    En palabras del autor: "The fundamental goal of the Semantic Web Project has already been achieved. Like the initial introduction of the Web, there wasn't an official release date — it just happened!"

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    Publicado el 29.2.2016 por Equipo GNOSS

    Google sustituye a Amit Singhal, responsable del buscador por John Giannandrea, CTO de Metaweb Technologies

    La empresa de tecnología Google anunció este jueves que Amit Singhal, el ejecutivo que ha dirigido las operaciones de búsqueda de Google durante los últimos 15 años, se retirará y será reemplazado por el líder de la división de inteligencia artificial, John Giannandrea. John Giannandrea era el responsable de tecnología de la empresa Metaweb , cuando ésta fue adquirida por Google en el año 2010. Metaweb es la empresa que creó Freebase (en proceso de cierre), que ha sido uno de los fundamentos de Google Knowledge Graph.

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    Publicado el 28.5.2015 por Equipo GNOSS

    Timeline: Google and Semantic Web

    En este artículo Bill Slawski hace un repaso de la historia de Google desde el punto de vista de la aplicación, en cada una de sus fases y evoluciones, de las tecnologías y desarrollos vinculados a la Web Semántica.

    A Timeline to Semantic Web Developments at Google, including Google's Second Patent, the Knowledge Graph, Hummingbird and other inventions.

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    Publicado el 28.5.2015 por Equipo GNOSS

    Demystifying The Google Knowledge Graph. Barbara Starr

    En este artículo publicado en Search Engine Land, Barbara Starr explica la potencia que tiene la aplicación de las tecnologías semánticas a la hora de enriquecer y extender el grafo de conocimiento que Google está creando, pasando de "strings a things" y cumpliendo la misión que se ha fijado:

    "Google’s mission is to organize the world’s information to make it universally accessible and useful"

    Finaliza el artículo dando una serie de consejos a la hora de elaborar una estrategia de SEO que incorpore el SEO Semántico y favorezca la construcción de este grafo de conocimiento. Estas serían:

    "In summary, there is a lot you can do to optimize a web page for the Knowledge Graph. My primary strategy, as discussed in this piece, is outlined here:

    • Determine what entities you want to target.
    • Determine what topics are of interest to your audience.
    • Send a strong signal your site is writing about that topic to the search engines by using structured markup (explicit entities).
    • Corroborate the information and strengthen that signal with the content you place on your site (implicit entities).
    • Remember: entities are not keywords, so do not treat them as such.  A mere mention in the appropriate  context can be a powerful signal.

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    Publicado el 28.5.2015 por Ricardo Alonso Maturana

    2014 SEO Roadmap: Adopting Semantic Markup

    In Google’s relentless pursuit of organizing the world’s information, the most exciting shift we’ve seen over the last year is about its ability to understand the “meaning” behind content (via the Knowledge Graph) and queries (via its Hummingbird algorithm update).

    In the past, Google had to rely on the words on the page, matching them to the words that someone searched on. Now, the revolution that is upon us is matching the intent of the query to the suitability of a page that matches that intent.

    This has significant implications for SEOs; and, as I speak with some of the smartest SEOs in the world about this shift, one of the recurring themes seems to be a new appreciation for and focus on semantic SEO.

    Smart marketers saw structured data markup as being an important part of their SEO strategy in 2012 and 2013. The trend and push around it has grown substantially — two out of three enterprises surveyed say they plan to make implementing or expanding structured data markup one of their top priorities for 2014 (Clarity Global SEO Conference, September 2013).

    I find that when companies begin thinking about whether or not to spend the time and effort on implementing or expanding semantic markup, most of them hit a snag because they start with the following question.

    Mitul Gandhi

    Mitul Gandhi has had 10+ years of experience in marketing and SEO consulting with Fortune 500 brands, which is the basis for his innovative approach to SEO. As the Co-Founder and Chief Architect of seoClarity, he has patents pending in the field of SEO analysis, and has been quoted in leading industry news sources.

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    Publicado el 28.5.2015 por Ricardo Alonso Maturana

    How Google's Social Search Shift Will Impact Your Brand's SEO

    In what could be hailed as the update that sparked an all-out Internet riot, Google has launched "Search, plus your World," which pours personal social results into your public search listings. The catch is that it only factors in your Google+ social graph, leaving Facebook and Twitter, arguably the more active social networks, out in the cold.

    This could prove to be an even bigger search engine development than Google's infamous Panda update, which aimed to remove sites with low-quality content. Why? Because it’s easier to write good content (or at least, hire someone to write good content) than it is to get people to share your content.

    Erin Everhart is the director of web and social media marketing at 352 Media Group, a digital marketing agency that also provides web and mobile app development. Connect with her on Twitter @erinever.

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    Publicado el 28.5.2015 por Ricardo Alonso Maturana

    How Google's Semantic Search Will Change SEO

    While the SEO game has changed drastically over the past months, one thing has remained fairly consistent: It’s been driven by keywords — keywords in your URL structure, your META tagging, your content, your links. Whatever way you slice it, keywords are everywhere in SEO.

    SEE ALSO: How Google’s Social Search Shift Will Impact Your Brand’s SEO

    Even among Google’s most recent algorithm updates — Panda, Search Plus Your World and Venice, to name a few — keywords remained relatively unscathed. But the upcoming update to move Google to semantic search technology, according to top Google Search executive Amit Singhal, is adding a whole new element to the game: the human element.

    Erin Everhart is the director of web and social media marketing at 352 Media Group, a digital marketing agency that also provides web and mobile app development. Connect with her on Twitter @erinever.

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    Publicado el 28.5.2015 por Ricardo Alonso Maturana

    5 Questions About Semantic SEO

    Earlier this month, I attended the SemTechBiz2013 conference in San Francisco. This is a gathering of creators and designers of the semantic tech stack, folks who work on semantic web standards, and representatives from the search engines, all coming together to discuss the state of the industry. There was a focus on semantic search and structured data markup at the show, reflecting the expansion of schema.org and Google Knowledge Graph as well as Bing Snapshots and the growing influence of the Open Graph Protocol.

    Aaron Bradley wrote up a fantastic list of key takeaways from the conference, and if you're attempting to get your head around semantic search, it's a great starting point. Blatant plug alert: I'll be talking about how to strategically adjust for these shifts in my talk at MozCon in early July.

    Marketers have a laundry list of activities to choose from to increase visibility, build brand, and drive engagement. It can be tough to quantify when to work on the hot new thing, especially when the words "Google" and "SEO" are prominently involved. When there are fundamental shifts in the SEO landscape (and I believe we're near the beginning of one of these shifts), search industry practitioners are often asked how to organize a strategy around the new tactical options. Here are five questions that I hope clarify the current state of semantic SEO and structured data markup:

    1. Is "Semantic SEO" a new term?

    2. What do "entity-based search results" look like now?

    3. So is the keyword dead?

    4. Is structured data markup a ranking factor?

    5. Will implementing schema.org markup actually hurt our search engine visibility in the future?

    Bonus question: What's the best move for web publishers?

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    Publicado el 28.5.2015 por Ricardo Alonso Maturana

    Metaweb video - Freebase

    On July 16th 2010, when Metaweb announced their acquisition by Google, they also launched a video that explains what Metaweb/Freebase does, what entities are, etc.

    Video Transcript

    You know what drives me crazy about words? They have a million different meanings.

    Like, check this out: someone says, "I love Boston." Now, they probably mean, "I love Boston, the big city in Massachusetts", but they could be referring to one of the twenty-six other Bostons that are scattered around the globe. But, if it's during the playoffs, they're probably referring to the Celtics [basketball team]. Of course, you and I both hope that they're talking about the Boston. You know. [Image of rock band, sounds of electric guitar.]

    But, I guess there's really no way of knowing. The problem is that the same word can mean so many different things. Because of that, when it comes to finding, linking, reconciling, or organising multiple layers of information, words are not the best solution. The guys at grocery stores figured this out back in the sixties when they started putting barcodes on everything, so that products with the same name wouldn't get confused.

    So how come on the web, so many sites still try to organise stuff with words? Say you're a product guy at a big music site and you want to pull in feeds of lyrics and videos and photos from all of your data suppliers. But everyone uses different names for things, and a lot of the feeds don't even match up, so you've got to reconcile them, and pull in updates, and deal with merges and deletes and splits. It's a nightmare.

    But what if there was a better way?

    Welcome to Metaweb. Metaweb is a service that helps you build your website around entities, and not just words. Whoa, what's an entity? Well the simple answer is, it's a singular person, place, or thing.

    OK, well, let's compare that to text. Did you know that on the web there are more than 50 different ways people write "U. C. Berkeley"? [Examples listed: Cal Berkeley, Berkeley University, UCB, California, U of Cal, etc.] And they're really just talking about one single place, one entity. By mapping all those words to a single entity, as if it had its own barcode, you can combine all that information about U. C. Berkeley into one place.

    But that's just the beginning. Because entities represent unique, real-life things, we can build a map that shows how they're related. So, you can look for things that share certain attributes, like "actresses under 20 from New York". Can you imagine trying to find that with a keyword search? [Shows typical keyword search results, with keywords highlighted: "NY blogger under fire for criticizing actress", "March 3 2004: New! 20 steps to be an actress", "Kid actress eats 20 York peppermints".] Entities are just smarter than words.

    So, Metaweb's been in the process of identifying millions of these entities and mapping out how they're related, and what words other sites use to refer to them. And it's really cool because they have a totally collaborative process that involves the online community. This thing will always be expanding and improving.

    So, how is this going to help you? Well let's say you're that guy writing the movie review. If you tag the review with an entity in Metaweb, it's like you're looking at a menu saying, "Hey, Metaweb, give me the movie poster and a trailer and some links and maybe some other information like the release date and who was in it." And BAM, it'd be right there. And now, your page looks awesome!

    Or, say you're that product guy at the music site. Instead of spending months doing messy integrations and maintaining all those feeds, you can just plug in to Metaweb, and suddenly everything just works. It's like a switchboard for content on the web. [Various logos related to web content: eg. Twitter, Facebook, Audio Scrobbler, Wordpress.] And not only that! When your site's built on entities, new things get magically connected. Like, if one of your users adds a band to her profile page, or tags them in a comment, that can show up on the band page, because they're all linked under the hood to the same entity.

    Are you kidding me? This stuff sounds impossible! Well, that's what they said about the barcode.

    And it's not just movies and bands. Metaweb has millions of entities in thousands of categories: twelve million and counting!

    Metaweb makes your site smarter. It's time to connect to the web. Metaweb.com.

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    Publicado el 26.5.2015 por Equipo GNOSS

    Build a small Knowledge Graph (Google)

    This video has  -part series. In this video, Jarek Wilkiewicz introduces you to the reference architecture for support of Schema.org Actions (http://goo.gl/vw8rOJ) in the context of a specific use case (a music store). The video then then focuses on exposing entities using Schema.org markup with JSON-LD.

     

    This is the third video in a 3-part series. In this video, Jarek Wilkiewicz builds on the previous two episodes to show you how to activate a small Knowledge Graph with Schema.org Actions (http://goo.gl/vw8rOJ).

    The the first video in this series (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W9pRp...) covers creating and processing linked data using Schema.org and JSON-LD.

    The second video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0oOwr...) focuses on data loading and graph processing using Cayley, and open source graph database written in Go (https://github.com/google/cayley).

    After watching the videos you will have a solid foundation to embark upon the Google I/O 2014 Actions Codelab (http://goo.gl/4ykgZ6).

    To learn more about the concept of hypermedia APIs touched upon in this video, see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UkAt9....
     

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